Skip to content

Geoffrey Chaucer Essays

The Life and Success of Geoffrey Chaucer Essay

893 Words4 Pages

Geoffrey Chaucer was a man with an interesting life to say the least. From imprisonment and royal service to being renowned as one of the greatest poets and writers of the 1300s. Chaucer's life had many mysteries to it as well such as what intrigued him to write The Canterbury Tales, one of his most famous works. Geoffrey Chaucer's year of birth is a bit of a mystery for no one knows for sure which year he was born. What is known is he was born around 1340 – 1345. He was believed to be the child of Agnes, niece of Hamo de Compton, and his father John Chaucer. Records show that around 1357, Chaucer was in service to Elizabeth, countess of Ulster, and wife of Lionel, Duke of Clarence. Her record shows that she paid for Chaucer's…show more content…

Geoffrey Chaucer was a man with an interesting life to say the least. From imprisonment and royal service to being renowned as one of the greatest poets and writers of the 1300s. Chaucer's life had many mysteries to it as well such as what intrigued him to write The Canterbury Tales, one of his most famous works. Geoffrey Chaucer's year of birth is a bit of a mystery for no one knows for sure which year he was born. What is known is he was born around 1340 – 1345. He was believed to be the child of Agnes, niece of Hamo de Compton, and his father John Chaucer. Records show that around 1357, Chaucer was in service to Elizabeth, countess of Ulster, and wife of Lionel, Duke of Clarence. Her record shows that she paid for Chaucer's clothing and expenses in small sums in April, May, and December. In 1359 Chaucer went to the war in France. While in France, Chaucer was held captive in the area of Reims. March 1st of 1360, King Edward III contributed £16 to his ransom. Records show that King Edward III paid Chaucer a pension of twenty marks for his past and future services on the 10th of June 1367. This means Chaucer must have been in King Edward's service about a year or two after his capture. Also during this time, Chaucer married his wife, Philippa de Roet, furthering his career in the English court even more. In 1370 Chaucer went abroad to fufill diplomatic missions in Florence and Genoa up until 1373. While in Genoa he had helped establish an English port. His

Show More

Essay on Geoffrey Chaucer

1158 Words5 Pages

Geoffrey Chaucer was born in London, the son of a successful wine merchant. After probably spending many of his childhood days in London's Vintry, his father did not send him to apprenticeship school, but rather to the aristocratic house of the countess of Ulster. There he trained as a page and learned the mannerisms and skills of the ruling class. "After that in1359-60 Chaucer serves in the war in France.1360 Chaucer, captured by the French, is ransomed (for 16 pounds)." (Benson, L.D pg 1).Chaucer then married Philippa Roet in 1366. Also in the same year Chaucer's father died. The next year was a great time in any mans life, Chaucer had his son Thomas. In 1380, Lewis, Chaucer's second son was born. "Twenty years later the great Geoffrey…show more content…

The Pardoner: An effeminate and shamelessly immoral man, the Pardoner is intensely self-loathing yet devoted to his task of defrauding people of their money by making them believe that they have sinned and need to buy pardons. His tale is an allegory about three rioters who find death through their avarice. The Pardoner uses this tale as an attempt to sell false relics to the travelers. The Miller: A large man with an imposing physique, the Miller is rude and contemptuous of his fellow travelers. His tale is a comic story of a devious student who contrives to have an affair with the wife of a dimwitted carpenter.

As you can see his characters are or sound like real people. There has been a major debate on if Chaucer wrote about real people and real things going on at his time. If you take the Wife of the Bath Tale; "First, she argues from scripture and experience that marriage is no bad thing, and that successive marriages for those who are widowed are perfectly in order. Arguments against marriage can be countered, the Wife shows, by demonstrating how Biblical teaching is far from clear in some places, while others give support for polygamy. She shows how St. Paul, in I Corinthians, claims only to advise his readers and expressly states that this advice is no binding commandment. Elsewhere the Wife notes Biblical precedent for polygamy, beginning with the obscure Lamech,

Show More